cross
   Watton on the Web
Home Contact Us About Us Our Church

Homepage The Subject The Topics The Bible The Morality
 

INDUSTRIAL STRIKES

By Keith W Munday

The history of industrial relations is not a happy one. Disputes have regularly occurred in which workers have protested over wages or working conditions. Trade unions came into being in the 19th century to protect workers from employers' exploitation, as up to that time they had no rights under British law.

Since that time the Unions' collective activities have gained considerable muscle, winning many advantages for their members. Much of this was accomplished by mutual negotiation, but where their goals could not be realised that way, they resorted to more practical protests such as going slow, working to rule or going for an out-and- out strike, downing tools.

No one likes a strike, except perhaps a militant minority who often have their own agenda (usually political). Picketing(1) is sometimes adopted to dissuade those who still desire to work. Secondary picketing however, where third parties are involved is not allowed.

Strikes can become bitter. There can be scuffles with the Police, injury to persons and damage to property. The strikers suffer loss of wages unless the Unions offer some help. There is often a knock-on effect to other companies that supply or who are served by the business in dispute. The general public also of course are greatly inconvenienced.

Industrial relations in Britain reached an all-time low during the winter of 1978/9 when bakers, refuse collectors, railway workers, road haulage and hospital workers, journalists, ambulance drivers and social workers went on strike. Strong feelings amounting to hatred were expressed. The turmoil compared with that of the General strike of 1926.

Index to the topic

THE ANATOMY OF A STRIKE
A BIBLICAL VIEW
THE CHRISTIAN AND THE STRIKE
AVOIDING STRIKES

Return to the Homepage


© 2002 Watton on the Web part of River Ministries (Norfolk)
Disclaimer, copyright and credit notices